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CLOUDS | AN ENERGY EXCHANGE PLATFORM

          

 

RISD B.ARCH THESIS 2021     ADVISOR: PROFESSOR ANNE TATE      

RISD UNDERGRADUATE THESIS PRIZE       

 

Do energy infrastructure and the city have to be separated? Energy infrastructure has always been considered as something that damages the quality of life; often rural areas are sacrificed for the sake of generating energy. With severe repercussions of climate change on the horizon, incorporating renewable energy in our cities should be of utmost importance. How will a city like Hong Kong, with limited land, react to global warming by re-imagining a new physical infrastructure through a canon of previous works that similarly occupy the air? A possibility is to consider the potential of an infrastructure that operates between the scale of the parcel and the scale of the city - a local, block scale system that can retroactively integrate with multiple existing buildings.

 

Hong Kong's Adaptive Skyline

From the 19th century to the present, Hong Kong has gone through multiple shifts and transitions in its architectural identity, mainly due to colonization, globalization, and its political climate. The change in Hong Kong’s imprint from a colony to a global city towards a Chinese future influenced the evolution of the city’s architecture. 

 

Hong Kong's Energy Generation

As a metropolitan city with over seven million, Hong Kong does not have any natural fossil fuel resources of its own. Hong Kong relies mainly on imported oil and gas and some electricity to meet the growing energy demand. 

 

Hong Kong's Land Utilization

Hong Kong is known for its density and the lack of land, but the built-up land of the city is only 24.9% of its total area. This is because the hills surround the city.

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